Corydoras and relatives

Perhaps the perfect community fishes, these little armoured catfish are firm favourites and very collectable, with s Read More

Perhaps the perfect community fishes, these little armoured catfish are firm favourites and very collectable, with species suitable for all levels of keeper. As a courtesy, we've used common names on our database but for the serious enthusiast it's best to use their scientific binomials. These are a good deal less confusing and guarantee that you're talking about the same fish. Currently this huge genus is awaiting a split into more meaningful sections. 

Generally sociable and often shoaling, Corys are best kept as groups of five or more in mature aquaria with a sandy substrate, which they love to root around in. Bold patterns allow fish to recognise one another, and some markings are mimicked by distantly related forms, giving them the perfect disguise within mixed-species shoals. Away from spawning tanks, species can be mixed but ensure that you avoid the temptation to collect them like Pokemon and always keep good numbers of each species. Although usually entirely peaceful, some of the long-nosed species can be more aggressive, with males often being competitive at spawning time and prone to damaging one another unless given a spacious tank which allows dominated males a chance to avoid conflict.

A number of these fishes are long established and domesticated, giving them a hardy and adaptable nature, which isn’t always the case for their rarer country cousins which demand conditions closer to their Amazonian homelands. Most show a distinct preference for cooler temperatures and may struggle if kept above 25c in the long term.

The larger armoured catfishes, such as Hoplos and Porthole cats, have much in common with their smaller kin but can be a bit too boisterous for timid tankmates.

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